Slovak message to Dublin about explosive was sent to incorrect address

The information sent by Telex from Poprad-Tatry airport to the Dublin airport about the explosive material that was not removed from a passenger’s luggage flying to the Irish capital was sent to the wrong address: to a company that handles luggage of departing and arriving passengers.

The information sent by Telex from Poprad-Tatry airport to the Dublin airport about the explosive material that was not removed from a passenger’s luggage flying to the Irish capital was sent to the wrong address: to a company that handles luggage of departing and arriving passengers.

The Slovak airport insisted it had sent the message while the Irish airport claimed it had not received any warning. It has now surfaced that the message was sent to the Servisair baggage handling company.

“We considered it to be an imitation of plastix explosive meant for training the police dogs,” the company’s spokesman explained for the Irish Times. “The plane would not take off with a true explosive.”

The spokesman for Danube Wings air carrier confirmed the company knew about the explosive leaving Poprad airport and added that the passengers’ security was not threatened in any way, the topky.sk website wrote. However, Irish media are of a different opinion and have written that Slovak authorities have endangered lives of many Irish citizens during and after the flight. www.topky.sk

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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