SaS is attracting voters from Smer and SDKÚ; Most-Híd from SMK

While sympathisers of the non-parliamentary Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party are mainly former voters for the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) (31 percent) and ruling coalition leader Smer (21 percent), another non-parliamentary party Most-Híd is mostly supported by former SMK voters (58 percent), the SITA newswire wrote.

While sympathisers of the non-parliamentary Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party are mainly former voters for the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) (31 percent) and ruling coalition leader Smer (21 percent), another non-parliamentary party Most-Híd is mostly supported by former SMK voters (58 percent), the SITA newswire wrote.

The two new parties (SaS and Most-Hid) also have significant preferences among first-time voters, specifically 21 percent in SaS and 18 percent in Most-Híd. These results were presented on June 2 by sociologist Oľga Gyárfášová of the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) think-tank at a panel discussion organised by the Slovak Association of Research Agencies.

She pointed out, as reported by the SITA newswire, that in 2006 none of the new political parties made it to parliament. SaS and Most-Híd have gained polling preferences above 5 percent in the latest election surveys conducted by Polis Slovakia, AVVM, Focus, and MVK agencies. The only exception is the poll conducted by Median SK, which found that only SaS would make it to parliament and that both Most-Híd and SMK would not make it to parliament.

According to the sociologist, the advantage of SaS is its ability to address voters of both the governing coalition and the opposition. In addition to significant support from first-time voters, SaS also has supporters from among former non-voters (11 percent) and voters of other political parties (16 percent). Its positive aspect is also its presence on the internet and social networks.

Apart from former SMK voters and first-time voters, Most-Híd also leans on former non-voters (five percent) and another 19 percent of its preferences come from voters of other parties. Gyárfášová added that a specific trait of Most-Híd is its ambition to become a supra-ethnic party that forms a bridge between the Slovak majority population and the Hungarian minority.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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