Recruitment agencies criticise new law

A law approved by parliament that will prevent companies from prolonging the employment of short-term contract workers more than five times over two years and instead requires them to be hired on a permanent basis, has been attacked by recruitment agencies, the Sme daily reported.

A law approved by parliament that will prevent companies from prolonging the employment of short-term contract workers more than five times over two years and instead requires them to be hired on a permanent basis, has been attacked by recruitment agencies, the Sme daily reported.

The change, based on an initiative by former labour minister Viera Tomanová, now a Smer MP, was anchored in an amendment to the Employment Services Act and will come into force in May, Sme reported on March 21.

Ľuboš Sirota, the head of the Association of Recruitment Agencies, told Sme that the change was “unprofessional”. Companies involved in industrial production tend to hire people through agencies, although their number does not exceed one-fifth of all staff.

Trade unions had demanded a change in the temporary employment of people via agencies. They wanted temporary employees to have equal conditions with regular staffers. Head of the OZ KOVO trade union Emil Machyna said that the approved change is only a partial solution.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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