May is LGBTI History Month

THE DÚHOVÝ Rok (Rainbow Year) initiative is striving for societal acceptance of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and inter-sex (LGBTI) community in Slovakia, and toward that end it has organised the Month of LGBTI History.

THE DÚHOVÝ Rok (Rainbow Year) initiative is striving for societal acceptance of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and inter-sex (LGBTI) community in Slovakia, and toward that end it has organised the Month of LGBTI History.

Starting on May 3, the month-long event will offer a host of activities in venues around Bratislava, including exhibitions (featuring one on the first Slovak queer activist, Imrich Mátyás), discussions on LGBTI issues, “queer” volleyball, dance lessons for sa-me-sex couples, a “queer” maypole, a literary competition for LGBTI writers, a film screening, concerts (by Tara Transitory and Shon Abram) and much more. Details can be found (in Slovak only) at duhovyrok.sk and citylife. sk, as well as on Facebook. The Month of LGBTI History was organised by the Inakosť (Otherness) Initiative and the No Mantinels theatre as part of a bigger project by Dúhový Rok. The event aims to reduce homophobia in Slovakia, increase society’s acceptance and awareness, and hopefully improve the overall atmosphere in society.

“May for everybody” is the slogan of the Month of LGBTI History. “Our main goal is to show that homosexuals have always been part of Slovak history, and they have also created our folklore and contributed richly to the growth of the quality of life in Slovakia,” project coordinator and head of No Mantinels Andrej Kuruc explained. “Maypoles were erected for and by people who were in love, but who often could not show it. Thus, we chose this to point out unfair differences in our society.”

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Source: Courtesy of NoMantinels

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