Slovakia opposes Brussels gaining more authority over nuclear energy, says Fico

SLOVAKIA is concerned about the European Commission’s interest in assuming more power over the nuclear energy sector, Prime Minister Robert Fico told the TASR newswire in an interview on May 3.

SLOVAKIA is concerned about the European Commission’s interest in assuming more power over the nuclear energy sector, Prime Minister Robert Fico told the TASR newswire in an interview on May 3.

Fico at the same time added that he fears that when exercising such extended powers the EU’s authority could base its decisions not only on security-related criteria, but also political factors. The premier explained that some EU member states strongly oppose the use of nuclear energy and these countries could put pressure on the states that use nuclear power via a supranational body.

The prime minister went on to say that Slovakia along with Hungary and the Czech Republic are among those ready to form a solid opposition to any potential anti-nuclear measures sponsored by the EU.

"We would need to reach some kind of an agreement. There's no other way out," Fico said, as quoted by TASR, adding that history has shown that if any opposing member states engage in negotiations and behave rationally they always find a mutually satisfactory solution.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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