Government approves Slovakia’s V4 presidency programme

PLEDGING to build on the achievements of the previous presidencies, Slovakia will take over the leadership of the Visegrad Four Group (Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovakia) from Hungary on July 1, observing the draft programme of Slovakia’s V4 presidency that was approved by the government on June 4.

PLEDGING to build on the achievements of the previous presidencies, Slovakia will take over the leadership of the Visegrad Four Group (Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovakia) from Hungary on July 1, observing the draft programme of Slovakia’s V4 presidency that was approved by the government on June 4.

Pursuing the motto “a dynamic Visegrad Group for Europe and the world”, Slovakia wants to boost the region’s growth and competitiveness in the year of its presidency, the TASR newswire wrote. It will mainly focus on consolidating public finances, stimulating economic growth and preventing tax fraud within the V4 countries. Slovakia also wants to focus on energy security, traffic infrastructure, security cooperation and a common foreign and security policy for the group.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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