Judges will be elected by secret ballot

The Judicial Council selection and dismissal of judges, Supreme Court chair and vice-chairs, Judicial Council vice-chairs as well as members and chairs of disciplinary committees will be held in a secret ballot vote, according to the proposal drafted by Smer and approved by the parliament on June 24. As of September, the legislation will introduce sterner rules for judges, including mandatory security screenings to determine their eligibility, the TASR newswire wrote. The changes are linked to the constitutional amendment sponsored by both governing Smer and opposition Christian Democratic Movement (KDH).

The Judicial Council selection and dismissal of judges, Supreme Court chair and vice-chairs, Judicial Council vice-chairs as well as members and chairs of disciplinary committees will be held in a secret ballot vote, according to the proposal drafted by Smer and approved by the parliament on June 24.

As of September, the legislation will introduce sterner rules for judges, including mandatory security screenings to determine their eligibility, the TASR newswire wrote. The changes are linked to the constitutional amendment sponsored by both governing Smer and opposition Christian Democratic Movement (KDH).

The approved bill also changes the way candidates are appointed to the Judicial Council and separates the position of the Judicial Council chair from that of the Supreme Court chair. [The constitutional amendment coupled with these changes also featured the enshrinement of marriage as a union between a man and a woman - ed. note]

The proposal also addresses disciplinary procedures, measures to combat the famous dilatory court proceedings in Slovakia and verification of incapability to work due to illness. Among other changes, the number of vice-chairs at larger-sized courts is increased and the tenure of court chair and vice-chairs is extended from three to five years.

All votes on personnel issues of judges, their appointing or recalling, of members of disciplinary senates and selection of judges representing Slovakia at international organisations will be closed to public, the SITA newswire wrote. The bill was elaborated by Smer MPs Boris Susko, Anna Vitteková, Otto Brixi and Anton Martvoň and it partially connects to the constitutional amendment of Smer and KDH that should tighten up the rules for judges.

The secret votes will worsen the state of Slovak judiciary, the Via Iuris organisation claims. If Štefan Harabin is elected for the chairman of the Supreme Court, public will not learn which of the Judicial Council members voted for him, Via Iuris warns, as quoted by SITA. The organisation added that other votes of the Judicial Council, too, evoked serious concerns about the bias and qualification in decision-making of its members. Via Iuris opines that the secrecy on the votes of council members will bring even more questionable personnel decisions, as the pressure of public opinion will decrease.

(Source: TASR, SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Black flags mark the SNP anniversary in Banská Bystrica.

SNP anniversary in Banská Bystrica featured black flags

SLOVAKIA commemorates the 71st anniversary of the Slovak National Uprising (SNP), one of the key moments in Slovakia’s World War II history, when rebels in the Nazi-allied Slovak state stood up to the oppressive…

Slovak Matej Tóth celebrates victory at the World Championships in Beijing

Slovak Matej Tóth won first gold in athletic discipline at World Championships

SLOVAK race walker Matej Tóth (of VŠC Dukla Banská Bystrica sports club) won a gold medal in the 50 kilometre walk at the World Championships in Beijing, while also winning the overall title in the prestigious IAAF…

Fashion show Korean style

Harmony of the unexpected

EVEN cultures and lifestyles perceived as exotic can have some meeting points; or they can have differences that complement one another wonderfully. Those willing to explore this phenomenon can, for example, get a…

Korean carmaker Kia Motors is the biggest Korean investor in Slovakia.

Korean companies are still coming

GOOD location, stability and human resources are among the main reasons Korean investors come to Slovakia. 

MOST READ ARTICLES


  1. Slovakia and its shameful policy on refugees
  2. Spiš Castle among top 500 ultimate bucket list destinations
  3. Korean companies are still coming
  4. Taking it in on two wheels
  5. Slovak grandfather receives birthday wishes from all over the world
  6. Slovak man's story part of Titanic exhibition in Bratislava
  7. Refugees die in a truck near Slovak border in Austria
  8. Pollution from communist era remains a problem
  9. Interior Minister surprised by news of refugee camp close to Austrian border
  10. Turčianske Teplice looking for engineering investment
  1. Slovak grandfather receives birthday wishes from all over the world
  2. Crooks may land €2 million in land deals for Jaguar Land Rover
  3. Slovak man's story part of Titanic exhibition in Bratislava
  4. Slovakia and its shameful policy on refugees
  5. Refugees die in a truck near Slovak border in Austria
  6. Interior Minister surprised by news of refugee camp close to Austrian border
  7. Spiš Castle among top 500 ultimate bucket list destinations
  8. Pollution from communist era remains a problem
  9. Skalica typical pastry “trdelník” is a hit in South Korea
  10. Countrywide events
  1. Slovakia and its shameful policy on refugees
  2. Crooks may land €2 million in land deals for Jaguar Land Rover
  3. Interior Minister surprised by news of refugee camp close to Austrian border
  4. Refugees die in a truck near Slovak border in Austria
  5. Slovak man's story part of Titanic exhibition in Bratislava
  6. Slovak grandfather receives birthday wishes from all over the world
  7. Use “women’s power” to tackle talent shortage
  8. A Slovak placed online ad offers money for shooting migrants
  9. Discover natural wonders by foot
  10. Slovakia should innovate within existing sectors