Smer’s support still dropping

A DECREASING number of voters prefer the ruling Smer, while the new Sieť party, founded by unsuccessful presidential candidate Radoslav Procházka, continues to gain ground.

A DECREASING number of voters prefer the ruling Smer, while the new Sieť party, founded by unsuccessful presidential candidate Radoslav Procházka, continues to gain ground.

If parliamentary elections had taken place the weekend of June 28, Smer would have won them with 35.3 percent of vote, according to the Polis Slovakia polling agency. Smer’s result is lower by 1.1 percentage point in comparison with the Polis poll from May, the SITA newswire reported.

The Sieť party would rank second, enjoying increasing popularity among voters. In the May poll Sieť received 15.4 percent of vote, and in the most recent Polis poll it garnered 17.2 percent. This means that Smer would win 71 seats in parliament, with Sieť taking 35.

Sieť was followed in the poll by the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 7.9 percent and Most-Híd with 7.8 percent, taking 16 parliamentary seats each. The Party of the Hungarian Community (SMK) would also make it into parliament with 6 percent and 12 seats.

Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) did not pass the 5-percent threshold needed for entering parliament, with just 4.9 percent. The Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) won 4.8 percent, and both Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) and the Slovak National Party (SNS) received 3.9 percent.

Compiled by Spectator staff from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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