Ballots at Judicial Council to be secret after parliament overrules Kiska’s veto

THE JUDICIAL Council will decide on personnel issues, including the election of the Supreme Court chair, through secret ballot despite President Andrej Kiska’s objections.

THE JUDICIAL Council will decide on personnel issues, including the election of the Supreme Court chair, through secret ballot despite President Andrej Kiska’s objections.

MPs overrode Kiska’s veto on July 4, confirming the original wording of the law on judges. MPs of the ruling Smer party argued that the secret ballot is more democratic, the TASR newswire reported.

"If an official is elected in an open vote, they may misuse their knowledge who voted for and who voted against," said Smer MP Boris Susko as quoted by TASR.

Kiska refused to sign the law after the parliament passed it for the first time, arguing that in the current situation it would be better to preserve transparent balloting at the Judicial Council.

Opposition MPs agreed with Kiska. Former justice minister Lucia Žitňanská of the Most-Híd caucus said that secret balloting on personnel issues at the Council has nothing to do with democratic principles, and added that transparency would contribute to improving the situation in Slovakia’s judiciary, TASR reported. Another former justice minister, Daniel Lipšic of the Nova movement, said that secret balloting allows for manipulation and corruption, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Matovič asks Fico to have polygraph test

LEADER of the opposition Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO-NOVA) party Igor Matovič has called on Prime Minister Robert Fico to undergo a polygraph test with him.

Matovič shows his accountancy documents.

ETP: State could learn from our work with Roma

WHILE some mayors struggle to improve life in segregated Roma settlements, the non-profit organization ETP Slovakia has helped hundreds of marginalized people construct their own houses. 

Slávka Mačáková, the director of ETP Slovakia

Final decision on NATO multi-national force due by July

NATO DEFENCE ministers, meeting in Brussels on February 10, greenlighted the establishment of a new multi-national force aimed at bolstering the defence of the member states most threatened by Russia's activities.

US Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (L), speaks with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg (2R) during a meeting at NATO headquarters in Brussels on February 10

BLOG: Central Europe enjoys strong start into a turbulent year

While the first readings of the year from CEE industry are encouraging, the worrying signals from its dominant export markets emerge.

A fourth carmaker, the British Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) company, is coming to Nitra.