People in Slovakia work four hours to cover basic shopping expenses

A SLOVAK earning an average wage has to work almost four hours to do common shopping worth €20, according to a Poštová Banka analysis.

A SLOVAK earning an average wage has to work almost four hours to do common shopping worth €20, according to a Poštová Banka analysis.

In the analysis, the bank based its calculation on the average gross wage according to the data of the Slovak Statistics Office, earned in 20 working days in a month with eight-hour workdays.

“For one €20 banknote, we can put in our basket, for example, flour, bread, meat and meat products, milk, butter, cheese, eggs, apples and also chocolate or beer,” the SITA newswire quotes the analysis. Analysts with Poštová Banka also say that if we buy more expensive products, the amount of time worked to pay for it is longer. For example, to buy things for €50, a Slovak with an average wage has to spend 9 hours and 45 minutes at work, while shopping for €100 requires twice as much.

Analysts also say that the inevitable working time is also prolonged in the case of people who earn less than the average wage, which is the case for many Slovaks. For instance, those who earn a gross wage of €500, have to work almost 6.5 hours to be able to do €20 of shopping.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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