Too much biowaste ends up in landfills

THOUGH Slovakia manage to cut the amount of the biowaste by one-quarter from 2010, it failed to meet its another commitment within the European Union’s landfill directive: to halve the volume of biowaste that ends up in landfill sites between 1995 and 2013, Environment Ministry Senior Advisor Maroš Záhorský told the press on August 6.

THOUGH Slovakia manage to cut the amount of the biowaste by one-quarter from 2010, it failed to meet its another commitment within the European Union’s landfill directive: to halve the volume of biowaste that ends up in landfill sites between 1995 and 2013, Environment Ministry Senior Advisor Maroš Záhorský told the press on August 6.

According to Záhorský, Slovakia should now focus on making good on the main objective: to squeeze the amount of biowaste hauled off to the landfill sites by 35 percent by 2020.

“Several significant changes have been proposed that should aid in cutting the biodegradable waste that ends up landfill sites,” Záhorsky said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The ministry has drafted a brand new Act on Waste that has already passed through inter-departmental review. Záhorský said it is impossible to determine at this point whether or not Slovakia can meet the commitment by 2020.

“This is questionable because the document is still under debate, and I cannot say at this point how it will shape up,” he said, as quoted by TASR, adding that the individual provisions of the draft law may still be changed by the government and parliament. “If it remains in the current version, then it can realistically be expected that we will indeed reach the goals.

Friends of Earth civic association head Branislav Moňok however said that according to his information requirements concerning biowaste in the bill were toned down during inter-departmental review, as reported by TASR.

An average Slovak produced 323 kilos of waste in 2015, with biodegradable waste accounting for around one half of the total. Up to 74.2 percent of municipal waste ended up in landfill sites.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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