Alleged crime boss Yegorov cannot return to Slovakia as he lacks passport

VOLODYMYR Yegorov could not personally attend his August 19 trial at the Trnava District Court. Yegorov, who was extradited from Slovakia to Ukraine in September 2013, lacks a passport, his attorney explained, and his extradition is still valid.

VOLODYMYR Yegorov could not personally attend his August 19 trial at the Trnava District Court. Yegorov, who was extradited from Slovakia to Ukraine in September 2013, lacks a passport, his attorney explained, and his extradition is still valid.

The court has postponed the proceeding until October 9, saying that Yegorov’s attorney, Juraj Baláž, must submit documents proving that he has asked the respective authorities to issue him a passport, the SITA newswire reported on August 19.

Yegorov, considered to be the head of an organised crime group since the late 1990s, has been prosecuted in various cases. The gang allegedly operated in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, Ukraine and Belarus, and was involved in leasing and insurance fraud and car theft.

The case being handled by a judge of the Trnava District Court concerns organising the murder of Miloš Žilinek, a co-owner of the erotic bar Dallas near Galanta. Baláž says that Yegorov wants to attend the proceedings in person, but is unable to for the above mentioned reasons.

If it is proved that Yegorov has not taken sufficient action to obtain a passport, the court could issue an international arrest warrant, the prosecutor of the Trnava regional prosecutor’s office told SITA.

Yegorov also faces charges of murder in other cases which are being overseen by the Bratislava Regional Court. He has not attended these proceedings either, explaining that he does not have a passport. The next proceeding in Bratislava is scheduled for September 22 and 23, SITA wrote.

Slovakia extradited Yegorov last September after the Constitutional Court accepted his objection to the verdict issued by the Trnava Regional Court in September 2011 over his custody. The court ruled that Yegorov’s basic right to personal freedom, guaranteed by the constitution, and his right to freedom and security, guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, had been violated. Yegorov had been in custody since 2002.

Though he was already administratively extradited in 2010, he did not leave the country, as he was taken into custody for another case in which he was accused, SITA wrote.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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