AROUND SLOVAKIA

Bratislava’s trolleybuses mark 105th birthday

BRATISLAVA’S TROLLEYBUSES have celebrated their 105th birthday. On July 19, 1909, inhabitants and visitors of the city (then called Prešporok in Slovak, Pressburg in German and Pozsony in Hungarian) witnessed the festive launch of the city’s first trolleybus line.

BRATISLAVA’S TROLLEYBUSES have celebrated their 105th birthday. On July 19, 1909, inhabitants and visitors of the city (then called Prešporok in Slovak, Pressburg in German and Pozsony in Hungarian) witnessed the festive launch of the city’s first trolleybus line.

This new means of city transport, propelled by an electric engine, was called the Electric Automobile Line to the Vydrica Valley. A ticket cost fifty hellers, or half a crown.

The first trolleybus line, however, was built in 1904 and led from the city of Poprad to Starý Smokovec in the High Tatras.

Plans to implement a trolleybus system in Bratislava had been under consideration since the late 19th century. Originally, trams were planned to drive to Vydrica Valley from 1908 on, but for economic reasons, a trolleybus line was built instead.

The first line in the city led from Predstaničné Square under the main railway station through Pražská and Brnianska Streets and Patrónka to the terminal station at Železná Studnička in the valley of Vydrica Creek.

The total length of the line was 5,800 metres and of the first seven trolleybuses, four were open and meant only for summer operation, while three were closed and operated in winter. The vehicles were constructed in Daimler Werke Wiener Neustadt in today’s Austria.

In summer, buses ran every 60 minutes in the morning and 30 minutes in the afternoon; in winter, the schedule was adapted to the weather, and 1911-1912 was the last winter operation.

In the following years, trolleybuses were operated only in good weather, and locals were informed of the schedule via announcements in newspapers and on billboards at selected stops. The trolleybus line operated in Bratislava until 1915, and was cancelled due to technological problems and uneven roads.

They did not return until 1941, when modern trolleybuses of German-Czech production were imported. A new line was added, running from the Slovak National Theatre to the Main Railway Station. Further new trolleybus lines were added even during the war.

Škoda trolleybuses started to be used in 1951, and some of these are still in operation today, according to the TASR newswire. After a slump in the 1960s due to the greater prevalence of regular buses, a boom occurred during the 1970s oil crisis that brought trolleybuses and trams into much wider use. The latest trolleybus lines include 207, 211 and 212.

Top stories

Korean carmaker Kia Motors is the biggest Korean investor in Slovakia.

Korean companies are still coming

GOOD location, stability and human resources are among the main reasons Korean investors come to Slovakia. 

Fashion show Korean style

Harmony of the unexpected

EVEN cultures and lifestyles perceived as exotic can have some meeting points; or they can have differences that complement one another wonderfully. Those willing to explore this phenomenon can, for example, get a…

Cycling at dawn on a route along the Danube River.

Taking it in on two wheels

AS SLOVAK cyclist Peter Sagan began having success at the 2010 Tour de France, the whole country began showing symptoms of what media calls the “Sagan effect”. 

There are about 120 old industrial waste dumps in Slovakia.

Pollution from communist era remains a problem

LEAKING toxic pollution from the old chemical waste dump in Bratislava’s Vrakuňa neighbourhood has already contaminated local ground water and continues to spread. 

Source: SITA

MOST READ ARTICLES


  1. Spiš Castle among top 500 ultimate bucket list destinations
  2. Slovakia and its shameful policy on refugees
  3. Slovak man's story part of Titanic exhibition in Bratislava
  4. Frisbee, more than just a flying disc
  5. Slovak grandfather receives birthday wishes from all over the world
  6. Refugees die in a truck near Slovak border in Austria
  7. Korean companies are still coming
  8. Interior Minister surprised by news of refugee camp close to Austrian border
  9. Crooks may land €2 million in land deals for Jaguar Land Rover
  10. Pollution from communist era remains a problem
  1. Slovak grandfather receives birthday wishes from all over the world
  2. Slovakia and its shameful policy on refugees
  3. Crooks may land €2 million in land deals for Jaguar Land Rover
  4. Slovak man's story part of Titanic exhibition in Bratislava
  5. Refugees die in a truck near Slovak border in Austria
  6. Interior Minister surprised by news of refugee camp close to Austrian border
  7. Pollution from communist era remains a problem
  8. Spiš Castle among top 500 ultimate bucket list destinations
  9. Discover natural wonders by foot
  10. Skalica typical pastry “trdelník” is a hit in South Korea
  1. Slovakia and its shameful policy on refugees
  2. Crooks may land €2 million in land deals for Jaguar Land Rover
  3. Interior Minister surprised by news of refugee camp close to Austrian border
  4. Refugees die in a truck near Slovak border in Austria
  5. Slovak man's story part of Titanic exhibition in Bratislava
  6. Slovak grandfather receives birthday wishes from all over the world
  7. Use “women’s power” to tackle talent shortage
  8. A Slovak placed online ad offers money for shooting migrants
  9. Discover natural wonders by foot
  10. Slovakia should innovate within existing sectors