Pressure in Russia's gas pipeline in Slovakia drops

THE GAS pressure in the pipeline that runs through Slovakia dropped moderately on January 1, Slovak gas utility spokesperson Dana Kršáková told the TASR news agency.

According to Kršáková, it may have been caused by Russia's decision to cut off gas to Ukraine over their dispute about price. However, the situation in gas deliveries to Slovakia is not critical, she added.

"Despite the pressure in the pipeline dropping, Russia's decision to cut off deliveries of gas to Ukraine should have no impact on gas deliveries to Slovakia," Kršáková stressed.

According to Kršáková, Russia has declared that its measures against Ukraine will not hit other countries.

Slovakia signed an agreement about gas supplies directly with Russia, thus the eventual stoppage of gas supplies to Ukraine should have no impact on our country, Kršáková said. "Russia will have to find a solution that will secure deliveries of gas to Slovakia via Ukraine," she added.

Russian company Gazprom stopped deliveries of gas to Ukraine on January 1 after Kiev did not accept the most-recent offer from Russian President Vladimir Putin and refused to pay Moscow's new price.

Compiled by Marta Ďurianová from press reports
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