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Hope: a new party for Slovakia

NÁDEJ (Hope) is the name of a new liberal party currently being set up by members of a special preparatory committee: Economy Minister Jirko Malchárek, Culture Minister František Tóth, and former Health Ministry state secretary Alexandra Novotná, the TASR news agency wrote.

The aim is to register the new party at the Interior Ministry within two months, and to call a founding congress.

According to the three co-founders, Nádej wants to attract "new faces" into politics.

"It will be a chance for people in all regions who are successful in their professions. They should realize that if they enter politics, they can change a lot of things," said Novotná. She expects that new members will not have a past tainted by corruption scandals.

Tóth pointed out that the new party wants to promote values such as the market economy, the right to make free decisions, civic justice, solidarity, human rights, and appropriate social guarantees.

The Nádej party agenda will also include the creation of new jobs, social-justice reforms, more money for the regions, tax bonuses for families, a lower (15-percent) tax, and less bureaucracy in Slovakia.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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