HISTORY TALKS...

Pribylina

THIS POSTCARD from the 1930s depicts old times meeting modern in the village of Pribylina in the Western Tatras. A carriage, probably from the 18th century, stands on an unpaved street with a pair of horses.

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THIS POSTCARD from the 1930s depicts old times meeting modern in the village of Pribylina in the Western Tatras. A carriage, probably from the 18th century, stands on an unpaved street with a pair of horses. Not far away is a car, perhaps one of the first ones in the village. Like other villages in the region, the people of Pribylina bred sheep to make a living. Many superstitions and customs associated with raising sheep lasted right up to the 20th century.

For example, in the spring, as the sheep were herded out to nearby meadows, villagers made a big bonfire outside the village and when it started to smoke, they added aromatic spices into it.

Then they drove the sheep around the fire and the chief shepherd made the shape of a cross on them with salt. This was believed to help keep the sheep healthy and productive in the coming season.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

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