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Police report improvement in tracing corruption

THE POLICE posted an excellent record in tracing corruption for last year. However, experts warn that the big fish are still escaping the nets of police investigation.

In 2004, of 238 corruption cases, the police cleaned up 188 cases. Interior Minister Vladimír Palko claims this as a success since it represents a ten-fold increase in the number of solved cases since 1995, the daily Hospodárske noviny reported.

However, the former head of the Department of the Fight against Corruption, Jozef Šátek, sees no improvement or even a mild decrease in the number of cases solved.

According to Šátek, the department has not really solved any cases involving large-scale corruption of state officials and representatives of the higher territorial units.

The head of the parliamentary Defence and Security Committee, Robert Kaliňák, shares his opinion.

Police President Anton Kulich disagrees, saying that the police have charged lawyers, physicians and even representatives of the local administration.

Compiled by Beata Balogová from press reports
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