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Ministry keeps ST sale contract secret

THE TRANSPORTATION Ministry again refused to publish data from the contract between the state and German telecom company Deutsche Telekom (DT) on the sale of Slovak Telecom to DT three years ago, the Pravda daily wrote.

The Občan a Demokracia (Citizen and Democracy) NGO is demanding publication of the contract. The NGO suspects that the contract obliges Slovakia not to approve any laws or decisions disadvantageous to DT.

The ministry refuses to publish the contract, arguing that it is a state secret.

In December last year, however, the Supreme Court ruled that the Transportation Ministry should deal with Občan a Demokracia's request, and explain which parts of the contract are secret and why.

However, the ministry insists that it is acting in line with the Supreme Court verdict.

"The court did not say that we should publish business data and the contract as a whole," said Transportation Ministry spokesman Tomáš Šarluška.

Občan a Demokracia is determined to continue demanding the publication of the contract, and is prepared to go to court again.

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