HISTORY TALKS.....

Modrý Kameň

DURING the first Czechoslovak Republic (1918-1938), when an old house was pulled down in the eastern Slovak town of Modrý Kameň, a clay moneybox with over 300 coins from the 16th century was found.

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DURING the first Czechoslovak Republic (1918-1938), when an old house was pulled down in the eastern Slovak town of Modrý Kameň, a clay moneybox with over 300 coins from the 16th century was found. One of the biggest numismatic treasures ever uncovered in Slovakia, however, says nothing in particular about the wealth of the town's citizens.

People lived in rather humble conditions: the treasure points more to the turbulent times the town went through. From the mid-1560s Modrý Kameň lay directly on the border of the Hungarian and Turkish empires, and its citizens could never feel safe regarding their assets or their lives. Somebody hid the box of coins to come back for it later, but they never returned.

Modrý Kameň is named after the castle atop the hill under which it lies. The town itself was not a "real" town for a long time. Historical documents referred to it as a "rural" or a "field" town, despite the fact that we see two motor vehicles in this postcard from 1938. It is likely that the townspeople parked them there to create a good impression for the postcard.

At that time Modrý Kameň was still just a small town set amidst meadows and fields.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

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