Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS.....

Modrý Kameň

DURING the first Czechoslovak Republic (1918-1938), when an old house was pulled down in the eastern Slovak town of Modrý Kameň, a clay moneybox with over 300 coins from the 16th century was found.

Click to enlarge.

DURING the first Czechoslovak Republic (1918-1938), when an old house was pulled down in the eastern Slovak town of Modrý Kameň, a clay moneybox with over 300 coins from the 16th century was found. One of the biggest numismatic treasures ever uncovered in Slovakia, however, says nothing in particular about the wealth of the town's citizens.

People lived in rather humble conditions: the treasure points more to the turbulent times the town went through. From the mid-1560s Modrý Kameň lay directly on the border of the Hungarian and Turkish empires, and its citizens could never feel safe regarding their assets or their lives. Somebody hid the box of coins to come back for it later, but they never returned.

Modrý Kameň is named after the castle atop the hill under which it lies. The town itself was not a "real" town for a long time. Historical documents referred to it as a "rural" or a "field" town, despite the fact that we see two motor vehicles in this postcard from 1938. It is likely that the townspeople parked them there to create a good impression for the postcard.

At that time Modrý Kameň was still just a small town set amidst meadows and fields.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Spectacular Slovakia #3: Unexpected hiking (Enjoy Bratislava's greenery) Audio

In Slovakia, you can hike in the capital city. Listen to the latest episode of our travel podcast to find out more.

The Financial Administration’s head resigns from post

František Imrecze says his decision was spontaneous.

František Imrecze

People will gather to support imprisoned Ukrainian filmmaker

The open letter in support of Sentsov has been signed by more than 2,800 people.

People hold posters to support Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov, who is currently on hunger strike in a Russian jail to demand the release of the other Ukrainian hostages taken by the Kremlin, in front of the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Kiev on August 21, 2018.

Institutions can be quickly destroyed, but they are hard to build

Head of the To Dá Rozum intiative, Renáta Hall, talks about the impacts of a dispute between the academy of sciences and the Education Ministry.

Renáta Hall