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Reader feedback: The right to be offended but not to kill

Re: Kukan: EU should back Denmark more vigorously in cartoon crisis, Volume 12, Number 08, February 27 - March 05, 2006

Kukan is absolutely right. If freedom is suppressed, then a road is paved for other freedoms to be challenged. People should speak out and stand together for what is right. When we have freedom of speech, there will always be someone that will be offended, but that is not a good enough reason to refuse to speak what you believe.

I don't agree with their beliefs, but they have a right to believe as they choose. But they do not have the right to kill 130 Christians, as they have done since this cartoon came out. In Africa, 6 children were burned to death in front of their father because they were "offended." Does this excuse this kind of behaviour? Of course not! I get my feelings hurt everyday, but I don't go and kill people.

Bowing to their demands of an apology would be a huge mistake for Denmark. It would be the same as giving in and agreeing with them. People have to stand together for the freedoms we have. Each time we compromise, we give a little bit of them up. So, yes, I think Kukan is correct in saying the EU should back Denmark.

Mary,
USA

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