MPs will not pay traffic fines

PARLIAMENT amended the country's traffic laws to eliminate fines for MPs. The move comes only two days after the police overturned a long-standing order that prohibited such fines.

As many as 116 MPs supported the amendment, but made an exception for MPs who are charged with driving under the influence. This is in reaction to a recent scandal concerning MP Ján Cuper of the Opposition Movement for a Democratic Slovakia, who was caught driving drunk.

The amendement, however, has provoked various legal opinions. Some lawyers say that the parliament actually extended MP immunity.

"MPs will enjoy a form of immunity they currently do not have by not having to pay for traffic offenses set in the respective law," Ladislav Orosz, an expert in constitutional law, said to the Pravda daily.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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