OECD: Slovak taxes down, payroll taxes remain high

ALTHOUGH Slovakia has relatively low income taxes, the state still claims a relatively high share of the wealth generated in the form of payroll taxes to the social insurer Sociálna poisťovňa and health insurance companies, according to a report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). A single childless person who earned an average income in Slovakia paid 38 percent of his or her gross wage in income and payroll taxes combined, which is slightly above the OECD average, the Pravda daily wrote. The highest sum of taxes and payroll taxes is found in Belgium, at 55 percent of the average income, while the lowest is in South Korea at 17 percent. OECD statistics also show that the financial situation of a Slovak family with two children living on one income has improved considerably. Such families paid 30.5 percent of their incomes in taxes and payroll taxes in 2000, while in 2005 the figure was down to 23 percent.

Top stories

A paraglider flies over a valley from the Martinské hole mountains.

The Slovak region compared to Tuscany is a big unknown

Set out on a trip to the Turiec region with a new Spectacular Slovakia podcast series.


17. jún

News digest: Slovak-Hungarian relationship has never been as good as now, Hungarian MFA says

Health Ministry fears spread of Delta strain from football match in Budapest. Hungarian Foreign Affairs Minister refutes claims of a negative relationship with his Slovak counterpart. Read more in today's digest.


18. jún
Child-initiated play is a style of play where children choose how, where, and what they wish to play with.

Blog: Play is the child’s work

Learning through child-initiated play.


18. jún
Illustrative stock photo

Law change makes cannabidiol legal

CBD allowed in cosmetics, but off the menu for food products.


18. jún