SURVEY

Slovaks work longer than EU peers

ACCORDING to a new finding by the EU statistics office, Eurostat, Slovak employees work an average of 41 hours per week - more than in most European Union countries - and spend 10 hours more in the workplace than Dutch employees, for example.

ACCORDING to a new finding by the EU statistics office, Eurostat, Slovak employees work an average of 41 hours per week - more than in most European Union countries - and spend 10 hours more in the workplace than Dutch employees, for example.

Eurostat claimed that populations in the post-socialist countries that entered the EU in 2004 work comparatively longer than in the EU15, the SME daily reported.

Economists attribute the longer working hours in Slovakia to the country's lower living standards and purchasing power compared to Western European states.

Martin Chren of the FA Hayek Foundation suggested that Slovaks will have to work harder if they wish to approach the Western standard of living.

He also noted that "labour productivity is still too low in Slovakia, having until recently grown faster than wages".

However, Ľubomír Čierny of the Confederation of Trades Union said the reasons for longer work were low wages rather than low labour productivity.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Maya expert: The world we live in is not the only one possible

Leading Slovak expert contributes to rewriting Maya history.

Milan Kováč

Slovakia had followers of Palach

Despite the efforts of the communist regime, people kept Jan Palach and his protest in their memory.

One of the student demonstrations in Bratislava, 1969.

Foreigners: Top 10 events in Bratislava

Tips for the top 10 events in the capital between January 18 and January 27, plus regular services in different languages, training, temporary exhibitions and highlights of the year.

‘All his own work’

To preserve their credibility, real academics must call out plagiarism.

Speaker of Parliament Andrej Danko