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Slovak Radio gets new director at last

AFTER six months without a director, Slovakia's public broadcaster Slovak Radio (SRo) finally got a new boss.

In an April 6 vote, the SRo Council elected the former mayor of Bratislava's Old Town district, Miroslava Zemková, as the station’s new director from a field of four competitors.

Zemková won the support of 13 out of 15 SRo Council members.

After the vote, Zemková announced she would like to cooperate with some of her competitors, such as the former head of the Slovak broadcast license council, Peter Kováč, and the current program director of the STV public broadcaster, Ľuboš Machaj.

Zemková has promised an extensive reform of SRo similar to the reform carried out in STV by the current general director, Richard Rybníček, the SME daily wrote.

SRo can expect extensive layoffs, restructuring, as well as a search for new sources of financing.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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