IN SHORT

Slovakia may become European logistics centre

SLOVAKIA could become a logistics centre serving the entire region of Central Europe, which numbers more than 113 million consumers.

The number of logistics parks in Slovakia are expected to double by 2010, according to market research agency Terno, as quoted by the business daily Hospodárske noviny.

Logistics centres in Slovakia took off between 2004 and 2005, while the country's soaring auto sector and spinoff industries will bring further logistics centres.

Terno analyst Ľubomír Drahovský said that in 2005 Slovakia had 16 logistics centres that each offer over 3,000 square metres of storage area. Most are located in Western Slovakia near Senec and in the Záhorie region, as well as Nitra and Považie. Others lie between Prešov and Košice near the border between Slovakia and Hungary.

The largest logistics park is near the D1 highway and the Trnava car plant of PSA Peugeot Citroen, with an area of 180,000 square metres.

Top stories

Vast damage after the supercell storm in southern Moravia.

UPDATED: Tornado damaged villages just across the Slovak borders

Czech authorities report three dead and hundreds of injured in southern Moravia region.


5 h
The Weekend of Open Parks and Gardens has became a popular event in Slovakia

Pandemic highlights the importance of parks and gardens

Parks and gardens across Slovakia will open during the Weekend of Open Parks and Gardens


21 h
The panorama of the High Tatras and the gravel lake between the town of Svit and the village of Batizovce in the Poprad district.

A Slovak castle appears in "Friends: The Reunion"

A brown bear toured a Slovak town. You can now tour a region filled with tasty wine.


4 h
A man waits outside a mobile Covid-19 vaccination centre outside Bolton Town Hall, England, where case numbers of the Delta variant have been relatively high.

How to change people's minds about vaccination? Experts hesitant that money is the answer

The state fears a third wave may hit hard in poorly vaccinated districts. The state should try whatever could work, researcher claims.


21 h