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Dzurinda: Bureaucracy and law enforcement still problems

ACCORDING to Slovak Prime Minister Mikuláš Dzurinda, excessive domestic and European red tape and weak law enforcement are the main barriers faced by business in Slovakia at the moment.

"Corruption is lower than four years ago, but there is still a lot of it here," Dzurinda said at a Hospodárske Noviny Club discussion forum on May 16.

"We need to talk about public tenders, about the length of time they take, and about the suspicions of corruption that often accompany them," he said.

Dzurinda pointed to amendments to legislation on public tenders and the commercial register, and to improvements in the practices of executors, which are aimed at improving the business environment.

The PM also believes that court proceedings take too long and lack transparency. The large number of new laws and legislative amendments haven't helped stabilize the business environment, he said.

Dzurinda pointed out that two years after joining the EU, Slovakia has had to conform to many European norms, and changes in legislation have also been necessary due to the introduction of various reforms.

The prime minister said that the foundation of a Financial Office to facilitate tax collection by focusing operations in one place would help reduce the administrative burden on business people.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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