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Hoax mails anger parties

THE Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK) received nearly 1,000 vulgar e-mails on May 22 sent from a general e-mail address of the far-right Slovak National Party (SNS).

The SNS has denied sending any such mail, and an initial investigation suggests that an unknown prankster is behind the act. The message was brief, saying: "You Hungarian whores".

The SNS itself received an unusual mail on that day. According to spokesman Rafael Rafaj, the party received more than 700 e-mails with the logo of the ruling Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) of Prime Minister Mikuláš Dzurinda. The e-mails said: "Vote for me. Dzurinda", the SME daily wrote.

The SDKÚ also denied sending the mail.

Both the SMK and SNS said they would file a criminal complaint in connection with the affair.

It was discovered that the e-mails were sent from a mail server belonging to the eTechnologies company based in Žilina, where Slota is mayor. The company thinks that one of its clients probably sent the e-mails, and promised to assist the police in finding the culprit.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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