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Air Show Sliač

THE SLOVAK Air Fest 2006 starts at 8:00 on June 10 at Sliač airport. The morning programme will include air force shows of Mig 29s, L-39s, L-410s, M-24s and MI-17s. An Interior Ministry MI-171 helicopter will be seen, as will a brigade of firefighters. Hungarian athlete Veres Zoltán, who's the Master of Europe in solo acrobatics, will close the morning block on Extra 300.

THE SLOVAK Air Fest 2006 starts at 8:00 on June 10 at Sliač airport. The morning programme will include air force shows of Mig 29s, L-39s, L-410s, M-24s and MI-17s. An Interior Ministry MI-171 helicopter will be seen, as will a brigade of firefighters. Hungarian athlete Veres Zoltán, who's the Master of Europe in solo acrobatics, will close the morning block on Extra 300.

The noon break will be filled with military processions. Meanwhile, sightseeing flights are on the programme.

Commercial and state military presentations will be combined in the afternoon. Slovaks will fly Zlín-37s and Czech performers will arrive on a Liaz 39 Cryton. A rare ultra-light Messerschmitt BF109G replica from WWII will be on display. The Očovskí bačovia acrobatic group will perform on L 13 Blaník sailplanes and Uli Dembinski from Germany will have his Slovak premiere on a Jak 55. The programme will culminate with an attempt to break the world record in the number of motorless L 13 planes being towed behind a Zlín-137 Turbo Čmelák.

"Last year, the Czech Republic towed seven. We will try nine," said Hubert Štoksa from the Slovak Aviation Agency, which organizes the fest. He added that there are around five smaller air shows taking place in the country throughout the year. "It's a satisfactory number for such a small country."

Tickets to the show cost Sk150. Sliač airport is close to Zvolen. For more information on the Slovak Air Fest and the programme of other air shows in Slovakia, visit www.airshow.sk.

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