Young people most open about voting preferences

SEVENTEEN years after the fall of communism, many people in Slovakia are still afraid to state their political allegiances openly, the Pravda daily found.

SEVENTEEN years after the fall of communism, many people in Slovakia are still afraid to state their political allegiances openly, the Pravda daily found. In a recent opinion poll on the June 17 general election, the daily discovered that first-time voters, students and pensioners were the most willing to answer questions about voting, while middle-aged voters were the most reticent.

Of all voters, young people and students were the least inhibited.

"Young people have gotten used to it. [They] aren't afraid that something will happen to them as a result," sociologist Zuzana Kusá from the Slovak Academy of Sciences said, adding that the same goes for pensioners. When categorized by profession, the most cautious were health workers and lawyers. Entrepreneurs were also careful, as they worried that expressing their political opinions could harm their business.

Top stories

The public's interest in vaccination started dropping after a short increase in the first half of November.

Lockdown decreases interest in vaccination

Interest in the first shot was on the rise in the past weeks.


20 h
Miroslava Sotáková

The great thing about Slovakia is the lack of crowds, says Slovak living in New York

Miroslava Sotáková works for Google and is bringing up three kids in New York.


5 h

Which are the largest law firms in Slovakia?

Several new partial categories were added.


29. nov
Illustrative stock photo

Super-deduction on R&D can help companies in crises

The funds saved through the tool can be used for further investments or stabilising the situation.


5 h
Skryť Close ad