BUSINESS IN SHORT

S&P: Slovakia's ratings will depend on post-election policy choices

STANDARD & Poor's Ratings Services said on June 19 that the outcome of the general election would not have an immediate impact on Slovakia's sovereign credit ratings of (A/Stable/A-1).

But if the newly formed government opts to depart from established stability-oriented policies, this could pose a risk to the country's creditworthiness, the agency said in a statement sent to The Slovak Spectator.

Slovakia's credit ratings were raised to their current levels in December 2005 based on public sector reform, strong growth outlook and the prospect of Eurozone accession in 2009. Further tightening of fiscal policy, a resumption of reform-oriented economic policy - especially tackling the social security system and labour markets - and sustained strong economic growth would lead to further improvements in the ratings.

Conversely, if a policy reversal were to lead to an expansionary fiscal stance, or a postponement of accession to the Eurozone, this would result in downward pressure on the ratings, Standard & Poor's said.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Six people involved in the surveillance of journalists, Kočner paid thousands

People who followed journalists for Kočner are trying to rid themselves of guilt.

Peter Tóth

Trump will meet Pellegrini at the White House

The two politicians will discuss defence and economic cooperation this May.

The White House

After historical sights in Slovakia have burned, is there better fire protection?

Kunerad Castle in the Žilina Region has burned down twice in eight years, and Krásna Hôrka is still undergoing construction seven years after burning.

Krásna Hôrka Castle caught fire in March 2012.

Taxpayers still pay for former PM Fico's bodyguards

The Interior Ministry refuses to say why or reveal how much Fico's security costs.

Smer head Robert Fico.