IN SHORT

New cabinet given reins of healthy economy

THE OUTGOING cabinet of PM Mikuláš Dzurinda handed over control of Slovakia's relatively healthy economy to new PM Robert Fico this week.

The country has been hailed throughout Europe for economic prosperity that includes GDP growth of more than 6 percent last year and wages that continue to grow faster than prices.

Unemployment remains a serious problem, despite decreasing to below 15 percent in March for the first time since 1999, SME wrote. Another problem is inflation, which hit 4.8 percent in May.

Slovakia's gross national debt was Sk524 billion (€13.85 million) at the end of March, which is around 35 percent of GDP. In 1998, when Dzurinda was elected to his first term, the debt was Sk272 billion. Although half the current level, the proportion of debt to GDP was similar to the current 35 percent.

"The starting position of the future PM is very good. He inherited an adequately indebted economy that has good prospects for the next four years," said Pavol Kárász, an economic analyst with the Slovak Academy of Sciences.

Top stories

Vast damage after the supercell storm in southern Moravia.

UPDATED: Tornado damaged villages just across the Slovak borders

Czech authorities report three dead and hundreds of injured in southern Moravia region.


5 h
The Weekend of Open Parks and Gardens has became a popular event in Slovakia

Pandemic highlights the importance of parks and gardens

Parks and gardens across Slovakia will open during the Weekend of Open Parks and Gardens


21 h
The panorama of the High Tatras and the gravel lake between the town of Svit and the village of Batizovce in the Poprad district.

A Slovak castle appears in "Friends: The Reunion"

A brown bear toured a Slovak town. You can now tour a region filled with tasty wine.


4 h
A man waits outside a mobile Covid-19 vaccination centre outside Bolton Town Hall, England, where case numbers of the Delta variant have been relatively high.

How to change people's minds about vaccination? Experts hesitant that money is the answer

The state fears a third wave may hit hard in poorly vaccinated districts. The state should try whatever could work, researcher claims.


20 h