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Reader feedback: Let's call it a jealousy tax

Re: Social state or return to the past?, Volume 12, Number 30, August 7-August 13

It is evident that you glorify the 'Jealousy Tax', David, but England is not Slovakia and vise versa. An 'Inheritance Tax' for instance, would in Slovakia have the effect that many average people would have to pay it, since many a Slovak fully owns their home. And if there are indeed some 50,000 people earning over 1 million crowns a year, the extra tax would only apply to what they earn more than that million. A maximum of 50,000 people represents less than one percent of the population, while their first million would still be taxed at 19 percent. So for a bit of mere tokenism, the lure of the 'Flat Tax' is going to be thrown overboard. Heck man, Slovakia is the most ideal country to experiment with the 'Flat Tax', and to use this as a magnet to attract foreign investment.

Oscar,
Radošovce

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