Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Business alliance dislikes social and tax plans

THE BUSINESS Alliance of Slovakia (PAS) welcomes the new government's intention to maintain the stability of public finances and improve development conditions for all types of businesses. On the other hand, PAS is concerned about several commitments, chiefly in the tax and social areas, which may cause the stability of public finances to deteriorate along with the quality of the business environment, SITA wrote.

"These commitments may lead to a higher general government deficit and a higher financial burden on businesses," said PAS executive director Robert Kičina on August 7.

PAS is also concerned that the government will increase the amount of regulatory control of business that in the future will lead to larger budget deficits as the government transfers certain responsibilities of the state to businesses. "We will closely monitor these developments in the upcoming period," added Kičina.

As far as the tax system is concerned, PAS would prefer a gradual cut in the VAT flat rate rather than a lower VAT rate on selected goods. Similarly, the overall easing of the financial and regulatory burden on businesses would bring higher benefits to the Slovak economy than the anticipated selective support of specific areas of the economy.

Top stories

Legitimising fake news

One of Slovakia’s media schools has invited a well-known conspiracy theorist to an academic conference. What does this say about the state of the Slovak media?

Tibor Rostas

Suicide game does not exist and visa-free regime for Ukrainians is not a lie

The Slovak Spectator brings you a selection of hoaxes from the past two weeks.

There is no computer game that makes people commit suicides.

It’s not easy being an ‘alien’ in Slovakia

Are Slovaks scared of foreigners? The stories of those who are trying to make their homes here suggest that ignorance and bureaucratic inertia, rather than fear, cause more problems.

Dealing with state offices may be difficult and time-demanding.

President Kiska uses train for first time Photo

After criticism from coalition MPs for flying and a troublesome car trip, Slovak President Kiska to commute to Bratislava by international train, boarding it in his hometown of Poprad.

President Kiska gets off the IC train in Bratislava.