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Johnson Controls employs 75 people in Lučenec

JOHNSON Controls' new plant in Lučenec in southern Slovakia, which began production in July, employs 75 people at the moment, but plans to raise the workforce to 340 at the end of next year.

The Lučenec plant produces foam parts for car head-rests for companies in Slovakia and abroad.

Johnson Controls manager Rainer Muller told the TASR news agency on September 4 that the firm was still looking for qualified people, especially those with good language skills.

The firm plans to invest Sk993.3 million (Ř26 million) in the Lučenec plant between 2005 and 2009.

According to its investment contract with the Economy Ministry, the government will provide investment stimuli worth Sk496.7 million, most in the form of tax breaks. Direct aid of Sk92.2 million will come in the form of job creation and training subsidies.

Johnson Controls already has plants in the Lozorno industrial park near Bratislava and in the town of Martin. It also plans to build a development centre in Trenčín.

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