Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

SURVEY

Study: Slovakia awash in local politicians

A STUDY by the Conservative Institute think-tank based in Bratislava has exposed Slovakia as "a land of politicians".
By September 28, the country's municipalities were to determine how many council and mayoral seats would be up for grabs in the upcoming December 2 municipal elections.
Four years ago, Slovak citizens elected a total of 2,926 mayors and 21,644 local councilors to local governments, giving the country 5 local council members per 1,000 inhabitants.

A STUDY by the Conservative Institute think-tank based in Bratislava has exposed Slovakia as "a land of politicians".

By September 28, the country's municipalities were to determine how many council and mayoral seats would be up for grabs in the upcoming December 2 municipal elections.

Four years ago, Slovak citizens elected a total of 2,926 mayors and 21,644 local councilors to local governments, giving the country 5 local council members per 1,000 inhabitants.

Of the four states in the Visegrad regional grouping, which also includes the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland, only the Czechs have more local politicians. Poland has the lowest ratio of local councilors to inhabitants at 1.4 per 1,000, according to the study.

Over half of Slovakia's municipal councilors serve villages of up to 1,000 inhabitants, even though the inhabitants of such municipalities constitute only 16 percent of the Slovak population.

An amendment to the Municipal Act in 2001 set new local boundaries and helped cut the number of local politicians in Slovakia from 35,616 in 1998 to 21,644 in 2002. However, according to the Conservative Institute, there is still room for further cuts.

Top stories

They reported corruption at the Foreign Ministry. Now they receive an award

The tenth year of the White Crow award, celebrating young people and activists who break prejudices and go against the tide.

White Crow award laureates

Blog: Slovakia’s time to shine is now

People may be able to recognise Slovakia’s neighbouring countries through associations with food, drinks, beautiful cities or well-known political events. But Slovakia remains very much "hidden".

Bratislava Castle

The day that changed the Tatra mountains for good Photo

The windstorm damaged 12,000 hectares of woods on November 19, 2004.

Tatras after the 2004 calamity

Smer follows a downward trend but may escape oblivion

What does the defeat in regional elections mean for the future of Slovakia’s strongest party?

“How could it be a fiasco when a political party wins most councillors among all parties?” asks PM Robert Fico.