HISTORY TALKS...

Palúdza

IN 1681, the Sopron Congress adopted a regulation that allowed Protestants in the Liptov region to build two churches. However, the churches could only be made from wood and without a bell tower.

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IN 1681, the Sopron Congress adopted a regulation that allowed Protestants in the Liptov region to build two churches. However, the churches could only be made from wood and without a bell tower. One of them was erected in Palúdza and the other in Hybe, for the benefit of the Protestants in Upper Liptov. Nowadays, only the church in Palúdza remains, and not in its original place. In the 1970s, the village was flooded during the construction of the Liptovská Mara reservoir. As a result, the church was moved to the village of Svätý Kríž, which lies a bit to the south.

The original wooden church was constructed in the late 17th century. The Protestants had to use the wooden bell tower at the nearby Catholic church. In 1774, the carpenter Jozef Lang built a new church, to which a wooden bell tower was attached in 1781, after Emperor Joseph II's Edict of Tolerance granted equal rights to all churches in the monarchy.

This postcard from the 1920s is a reproduction of a painting by Václav Malý depicting the church in its original location.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

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