Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slota rejects extremism, then stalks off TV talk-show

JÁN SLOTA, the temperamental leader of the far-right Slovak National Party, lost his cool in the middle of a live TV talk-show last night and stalked out, leaving host Daniel Krajcer and the other guest of the show, former Justice Minister Daniel Lipšic, to complete the debate on their own.

Slota managed to remain calm during the initial topic on the De Facto talk show, relations between Hungary and Slovakia, but when the discussion turned to the need to retain the Special Court for organized crime cases, Slota suddenly stood up.

“I don’t have to listen to this,” he said, and walked off the set 15 minutes before the show on JOJ TV was due to end.

At the moment of Slota’s outburst, Lipšic had been defending the Special Court, which Slota and other members of the ruling coalition want to abolish.

“I don’t have the strength left to say anything, I’ll leave the rest to him,” Slota said.

Slota had threatened to leave repeatedly during the show, and said it was only with gritted teeth that he had agreed to appear with Lipšic, whose tenure as minister from 2002 to 2006 “I think only the worst of”.

When Lipšic reminded Slota of his comments that the residents of Teplička, who were resisting the expropriation of their land for the construction of the KIA car factory, could “go stick their carrots up their asses”, Slota said that Lipšic did not understand the matter.

"Don’t be a clown," the nationalist leader said, accusing Lipšic of misunderstanding events "in that mixed up head of yours".

The presence of the SNS in the ruling coalition has been a problem in the international arena for Slovak government figures, and Slota’s behaviour has been under particularly close scrutiny. In the past, the nationalist leader was infamous for his insults to ethnic Roma and Hungarians.

Before the TV talk-show, however, Slota had made a public statement claiming the SNS rejected extremism and supported the rights of minorities. The statement was part of an effort to help PM Robert Fico’s Smer party avoid suspension by the Party of European Socialists tomorrow for cooperating with the SNS.

“The SNS respects the different cultural-historical traditions of nations, and recognizes… the principles of tolerance, respect, humanism, and the rejection of discrimination, nationalism, racism and xenophobia,” the SNS statement read.

“We strenuously reject all expressions of racial, ethnic or national hatred anywhere in Europe… we condemn the activities of extremist groups and individuals, who under the banner of nationality discharge their deviant violent tendencies on members of minorities living in Slovakia. We categorically distance ourselves from any form of verbal attacks on the honour and dignity of Slovaks who belong to some minority.”

Top stories

Fico: We cannot allow multi-speed EU to become divisive Video

Final session of the 12th edition of Globsec 2017 featured Slovak PM Robert Fico, Czech PM Bohuslav Sobotka, and President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, in a panel entitled European (Dis)Union?

Donald Tusk, Robert Fico, and Bohuslav Sobotka (left to right)

Slovakia lures tourists

The country is attractive for visitors as a friendly and safe country with plenty of tourist draws .

Slovak mountains are attractive the year round.

EU roaming fees to end on June 15 – in theory

Slovak customers still waiting to find out how mobile operators will implement change.

Archaeologist pieces together early history of what is now western Slovakia Photo

For an archaeologist, the most important thing is his most recent rare discovery, says Július Vavák.

Students visited Svätý Jur as part of their European Wanderer project