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Slota urges Slovak parties not to cooperate with SMK

THE RULING coalition Slovak National Party (SNS), at its congress on October 21, called on all Slovak political parties to distance themselves from the ethnic-Hungarian SMK party until the latter condemns extremists who call into question historical decisions that set Slovakia’s modern border with Hungary - the Trianon Treaty and the Beneš Decrees.

"This is very important if politics in Slovakia are to work properly... The so-called big democrats in the SMK are casting doubt on the Trianon Treaty, as political parties in Hungary do," said SNS Chairman Jan Slota, who was re-elected to his post at the congress.

The Trianon Treaty was signed in 1920 at the end of the First World War at the Grand Trianon Palace in Versailles. As a result of the treaty, Hungary lost two thirds of its former territory, including that of modern-day Slovakia. Out of Imperial Hungary's population of 18 million, only 7.6 million remained within the new borders of Hungary, the TASR news wire wrote.

Under the controversial Beneš Decrees drawn up after the Second World War, many ethnic Hungarians and Germans were stripped of their land and expelled from the former Czechoslovakia due to their alleged collaboration with the Nazis.

Opposition parties and the governmental Movement for Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) rejected the call, while the ruling Smer party did not respond.

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