Planned changes in Labor Code favors employees

HIGHER severance pay, shorter work time, limitation of temporary work contracts for employees and the restriction of forced employment through trade licenses are among the planned changes in the Labor Code revisions which Labor Minister Viera Tomanová wants to submit to the government by March of next year.

However, employers, who are happy with the current Labor Code, are against the planned changes being demanded by the labor unions, Pravda wrote.

Labor unions are demanding that the work week should not exceed 48 hours including work emergencies at workplaces. They also want employees to enjoy the same rights regardless of whether the employees are part-time or full-time. Currently part-time employees who work fewer than 20 hours per week are entitled to a shorter notice period and lower severance pay.

“It is discrimination that we want to eliminate,” said Vladimír Mojš from the Confederation of Labor Unions (KOZ).

PM Robert Fico also supports changes in the Labor Code.

“It is definitely not right that Slovakia has a law which enables people to work from dawn till dusk. I think there should be certain limits,” Fico said recently.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Better times ahead for the Calvary in Bratislava

The last preserved station was restored this summer.

The last preserved station of the Stations of the Cross in Bratislava

Why you need to buy a belt

On this Black Friday, with society teetering on the brink of chaos, I ask that we all do our part.

Roundup: Bratislava’s Old Market Hall hosts Christmas markets

If you have not watched the 'Dracula' miniseries, filmed in Slovakia last year, it is about time.

Bratislava’s Old Market Hall will provide visitors with Christmas vibes in the coming four weeks. Each week, from Wednesday to Saturday, people can do a little bit of Christmas shopping at the venue.

Fico admits to ties with Bödör

Former prime minister stands by his praise for the state secretary who confessed to corruption and court interference.

Robert Fico during his November 26 press conference.