Bratislava Airport to adopt new EU security rules as of November 6

AS OF November 6, Slovak airports will adopt a new EU directive on civil aviation security which the European Commission (EC) approved last month, press secretary of the EC Representation to Slovakia Roman Schönwiesner told the TASR newswire.

The stricter checks, designed to reduce the threat of terrorism, were mandated after British police in August thwarted planned terrorist attacks on a number trans-Atlantic flights.

Along with weapons, explosives and chemicals, the list of banned items in hand luggage will include liquids and gels such as drinks, perfumes, syrups, aerosols, toothpaste and hair gel.

The restrictions will also concern the amount of liquids and gels allowed on board aircraft for personal needs. Containers must hold no more than 100 millilitres and must be wrapped in transparent bags with a capacity of no more than one litre.

"The restrictions will not affect liquids in the luggage that passengers hand over at check-in nor liquids bought in shops beyond the security controls," said Andrea Elschek–Matis, head of the EC Representation to Slovakia.

The EC is also introducing new rules for electronic devices. For example, lap-tops and large electronic appliances will have to go through individual detector checks along with passengers' coats and jackets.

In addition, the size of hand luggage will be limited to 56x45x25 centimetres as of March 2007. The only exceptions will be for fragile items such as musical instruments.

The new rules will apply to all airports in the EU, plus Iceland, Norway and Switzerland.

As an extra measure to improve security, a new shoe detector was installed at Bratislava airport on October 25.

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