Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

LADISLAV REHÁK DETAINED, COMPANY PREMISES RAIDED

Top businessman and sons charged with extortion

POLICE arrested one of the most influential businessmen in Slovakia, Ladislav Rehák, and his two sons Martin and Juraj on November 7, and held them in custody on suspicion of extortion. As The Slovak Spectator went to print, a court was deciding whether to uphold a motion by the prosecution to remand the three men along with two companions in pre-trial custody.
Ladislav Rehák is chairman of the board of Orange, the country's largest mobile operator, and owns or manages

Ladislav Rehák.
photo: Leaders.sk

POLICE arrested one of the most influential businessmen in Slovakia, Ladislav Rehák, and his two sons Martin and Juraj on November 7, and held them in custody on suspicion of extortion. As The Slovak Spectator went to print, a court was deciding whether to uphold a motion by the prosecution to remand the three men along with two companions in pre-trial custody.

Ladislav Rehák is chairman of the board of Orange, the country's largest mobile operator, and owns or manages 17 other companies, including several media such as the Týždeň weekly.

Police have slapped an "information embargo" on the case, but police corps president Ján Packa said the three Reháks had been charged with extorting money from a female accountant who worked for them for two years.

Packa said the men had forced the accountant to sign a statement at a public notary acknowledging that she owed them Sk5 million.

However, the men, through their lawyer Ondrej Mularčík, said that the accountant had actually embezzled the sum from their firms, and that rather than going to the police they had chosen to get her to acknowledge the debt and repay it.

The police say a doctor confirmed that the accountant was "slightly injured", and that this medical report forms part of the evidence against the men, whose crime is considered exceptionally serious under Slovak law.

Mularčík said there was nothing to confirm that any one of the Reháks had caused the woman's injuries. He also objected to the reasons the prosecution cited in requesting pre-trial custody, saying that Rehák was unlikely to flee trial, as the prosecution claimed, given that he had returned home from a trip to the Czech Republic immediately when he heard that his sons had been arrested.

Packa claimed the entrepreneur and his sons had been arrested because police wanted to prevent them from carrying out their aims.

Police dubbed their planned raid Svätuškár (Holy Roller), although Packa denied that the choice of name had anything to do with the fact that Rehák had sponsored the opposition Christian Democrats with a gift of Sk600,000 in 2003.

According to Packa, the name of the raid was taken from the day it began - All Saints Day, November 1.

Top stories

How the national emblem appeared – including so far secret communism designs

Even Slovaks often do not know why the national emblem depicts a white double-cross, and not the Kriváň peak, or the design by artist Vincent Hložník. They also do not know why it makes a difference whether it is…

Offical Slovak national emblem and colours

Bratislava Zoo will have new wolf breeding station

One of most significant investments of the Bratislava Zoo in the year 2017 will be the building of a new wolf breeding station.

Foreigners: Events around Slovakia Photo

Tips for performances and other events in the Slovak regions between February 17 and February 26, including a race on old wooden sleighs, an operetta premiere, a lot of jazz, classical and rock music, and more.

Rce in krňačky sleighing, Turecká 2017

Some food really is better in Austria, study finds

EC says its role is to monitor safety, not quality – but Slovaks want the same as Austrians, says minister.

Illustrative stock photo