HISTORY TALKS...

Piešťany

PIEŠŤANY'S thermal springs and therapeutic sulphur mud have lured people for generations.
But before it became a famous spa town, it was a settlement on the sandy embankment of the Váh river. This is why its name comes from piesok, "sand" in Slovak.

Click to enlarge.

PIEŠŤANY'S thermal springs and therapeutic sulphur mud have lured people for generations.

But before it became a famous spa town, it was a settlement on the sandy embankment of the Váh river. This is why its name comes from piesok, "sand" in Slovak.

Piešťany gained its reputation as a spa town in the 16th century, during which a renaissance of the spa treatment was being experienced. As early as 1545, people suffering from rheumatism bathed in the water from small holes they had dug on the banks of the Váh. Nearby inhabitants continued coming to take such baths until the beginning of the 20th century.

There is also a sad story related to such primitive bathing holes. During the times of the encroaching Turkish invasion, a Turkish unit attacked a group of bathers and killed most of them.

In 1889, businessman Alexander Winter turned Piešťany into a world attraction. And in February 1917, Piešťany was where Wilhelm II of Germany, Karl I of Austria-Hungary and Ferdinand I of Bulgaria met to plan their war strategy. Prominent visits continued into the 1930s, when well-known American actress Lilian Gish underwent a treatment there.

This postcard shows Piešťany in the 1920s.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Another former police president reportedly charged in a corruption case

NAKA charged eight former high-ranking police, SIS and Financial Administration officials.

Milan Lučanský

Haščák of Penta detained and accused

Dozens of police officers raided Digital Park, the headquarters of the financial group.

Jaroslav Haščák

Economy minister Sulík is the most trustworthy politician regarding solutions to the pandemic

More than half of respondents also think that the government underestimated preparation for the second wave.

Richard Sulík introduces his plan.

Car industry needs to jump on the latest trends

Economy minister promises extensive support for hydrogen technologies in Slovakia.

The Hydrogen Technology Research Centre (CVVT) is to be launched at the end of 2020 or beginning of 2021 in Košice to do R&D in this field.