Another footballer reports massive corruption in Slovak game

MARTIN Kuna, a former captain of premier league team Artmedia Bratislava, has become the latest in a series of Slovak footballers to allege that the national game is awash with corruption.

Kuna spoke to the SME daily newspaper following allegations by a former teammate, Martin Karnas, that corruption was widespread, and that he had once been told by a team captain to help throw a game.

“I don’t want to have anything to do with Slovak football,” Kuna said. “It’s awful, just one big sewer. Unfortunately, it’s even worse than Karny made out. I could tell you a lot of stories that are even more scandalous.

“But I can bet you that nothing will come from this. In Slovakia no one ever really solves anything. I’m not afraid to talk, I’m just disgusted that there wouldn’t be any point.”

Slovak Football Association (SFZ) President František Laurinec has said he respects the courage of Karnas and that he will cooperate with police in ridding the game of corruption.

However, he added that “there is an evident tendency to concentrate on the negative in football”, and said that “I am most bothered that there is more invective than proof”.

Former referee Marián Diňa was the first to blow the whistle on corruption in Slovak football in an interview published on November 22 last year in the Nový Čas tabloid.

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