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Harabin rejects Králik as head of Special Court

JUSTICE Minister Štefan Harabin has refused to name the current head of the Special Court, Igor Králik, as the court's new chief justice even though he officially won a tender for the post.

Harabin said on January 3 that he would still have to think about selecting Králik. However, a new tender for the post has already been announced, the Pravda daily wrote.

Králik remained the only option for Harabin after justices Michal Truban and Oldřich Kozlík, who finished second and third in the job tender, gave up their candidacies in favour of Králik.

According to Harabin, this development put him in an awkward situation.

"I have to consider these things so I’m not suspected of giving special preference to Mr. Králik, whose qualities I've highlighted several times," the minister said.

Since taking office last summer, Harabin has been a strong advocate of abolishing the Special Court, which deals with mafia and high-level corruption cases. The minister has said the court is expensive and unnecessary; its defenders say it is the only court in the country with the independence and the courage to sentence powerful criminals.

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