Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS...

Partisans in the mountains

Click to enlarge.

THIS POSTCARD from 1944 shows partisans of the Slovak National Uprising (SNP) building shelters in the mountains of central Slovakia. The SNP is one event from Slovak history that has long been underappreciated. During World War Two, partisans struggled against huge odds to battle four or five divisions at the rear of the retreating German army. Thousands of partisans, some of whom came from abroad, such as France, and many Soviet instructors took part. The uprising was firstly directed at the pro-German Slovak State. Therefore, it was no surprise that Germany responded quickly and sent a huge army to quash it. From August 29 to the end of October 1944, the partisans attacked German stations, railways and plants in expectation that the Red Army would fight its way to Slovakia. But German units stationed in eastern Slovakia defended the Dukla Pass so vehemently, Soviet soldiers couldn't advance, and the uprising was suppressed. Nevertheless, the partisans served to distract the Germans, who had to fight hardest near Strečno Castle and the town of Telgárt.

The SNP is not recognized much outside of Slovakia either. But this is quite understandable when put into the context that a range of other dramatic events were taking place in Europe at that same time.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

Top stories

Keep your passport at hand on your trip to Austria

There are no internal border controls on the Austrian-Slovak border. Yet, the Austrian police check cars and buses heading to Slovakia.

Slovak police checking cars at the border crossing in Berg, Austria.

Bratislava ice stadium will require €2 million

At the same time, its tenant, ice hockey club Slovan, owes some €1 million in rent.

The Ondrej Nepela ice-hockey stadium during 2011 ice hockey world championship.

Who do Slovaks marry the most among foreigners?

Mixed marriages are still quite rare among Slovaks compared to elsewhere in the EU. Slovak women are more likely to marry foreigners than Slovak men. Here is why.

Italy points to “illegal state aid” as Embraco announces relocation to Slovakia

The decision to shift production follows in the footsteps of US conglomerate Honeywell, which reportedly also plans to close its Italian plant and move to Slovakia.

Embraco plant in Spišská Nová Ves