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Červený Kameň

IT'S ALMOST AS IF Červený Kameň Castle in the Low Carpathians has had two lives. The first was around 1240, when it was a typical fortification of the Middle Ages.

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IT'S ALMOST AS IF Červený Kameň Castle in the Low Carpathians has had two lives. The first was around 1240, when it was a typical fortification of the Middle Ages. The second started in the 16th century, when it was rebuilt as a base for Europe's wealthiest business family, the Fuggers. At that time, the renaissance fortification served two purposes: to guard against the Ottomans and to store copper and wine in huge underground warehouses. The copper was then shipped to Vienna, where the Fuggers had a large factory. There were also a number of breweries on the estate, run mostly by brewers from Moravia, that made beer from barley and wheat. Originally, servants picked the wild hop necessary, but from the 17th century, it was grown in gardens. The castle's park still contains the tallest chestnut tree in Slovakia.

This postcard shows Červený Kameň in 1926, embraced by the Low Carpathians.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

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