Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Air traffic controllers to go on strike

AIR TRAFFIC controllers in Slovakia plan to strike on Thursday to demand the dismissal of Roman Bíro, the director of the state-run air traffic control administrator, Letové Prevádzkové Služby (LPS).

The controllers claim that Bíro is responsible for deteriorating standards of air safety, and say they are concerned that the lives of airline passengers are at risk.

However, if the air traffic controllers go on strike, the Transport Ministry says it will consider the strike illegal and will claim any damages that may arise. Transport Minister Ľubomír Vážny said he rejects the charge that passengers are at risk.

Vážny noted that an air traffic safety inspection carried out last year found that Slovakia meets air traffic standards and that minor defects in safety have been removed.

The minister said he suspects that air traffic controllers are using safety concerns as a pretext to gain advantages for themselves. At an average wage of Sk200,000 per month, Vážny said, air traffic controllers have no reason to be dissatisfied with their salaries.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).