Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Air traffic controllers to go on strike

AIR TRAFFIC controllers in Slovakia plan to strike on Thursday to demand the dismissal of Roman Bíro, the director of the state-run air traffic control administrator, Letové Prevádzkové Služby (LPS).

The controllers claim that Bíro is responsible for deteriorating standards of air safety, and say they are concerned that the lives of airline passengers are at risk.

However, if the air traffic controllers go on strike, the Transport Ministry says it will consider the strike illegal and will claim any damages that may arise. Transport Minister Ľubomír Vážny said he rejects the charge that passengers are at risk.

Vážny noted that an air traffic safety inspection carried out last year found that Slovakia meets air traffic standards and that minor defects in safety have been removed.

The minister said he suspects that air traffic controllers are using safety concerns as a pretext to gain advantages for themselves. At an average wage of Sk200,000 per month, Vážny said, air traffic controllers have no reason to be dissatisfied with their salaries.

Top stories

A Slovak prisoner tattooed in Auschwitz, remained silent until he grew very old

Lale Sokolov fell in love in the concentration camp; only those close to him knew his story.

A tattoo, illustrative stock photo

Kiska: Only president can bestow awards

President Andrej Kiska turned to Constitutional Court over the law on state awards recently passed by the government.

President Andrej Kiska granting awards, January 1, 2018

Global warming is a myth, claims a hoax

According to recent hoaxes published online, snow in the Sahara disproves global warming and milk can block airways.

The snowfall in Sahara can be seen in this satellite picture.

Blog: Are flying cars coming to the skies?

At least 19 companies, including a Slovak one, are currently developing flying car planes, but there are still many issues that must be worked out.

AeroMobil