Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Minister apolgizes to former president

A COURT dispute between Slovakia's former president, Rudolf Schuster, and two Bratislava hospitals has come to an end.

The operators of the hospitals - the interior and health ministries - which are now controlled by the ruling socialist Smer party reached an agreement with Schuster, while Health Minister Ivan Valentovič made a public apology to the ex-president.

However, the hospitals themselves said they were not aware of the agreement. Until now, they have maintained that their doctors made no errors in treating Schuster for a ruptured colon back in 2000.

Anesthesiologist Milan Májek from the Dérerova hospital, who is also the head of the clinic where Schuster was treated, said he regarded the agreement as a betrayal. "This is dirty tactics," he told the Sme daily.

In June 2000 Schuster was hospitalized with a high fever, and his situation quickly deteriorated. At the end of June doctors put him on the critical list, at which point Schuster's family decided to have the then-president moved to Innsbruck for treatment.

Schuster later sued the two Bratislava hospitals for Sk450,000.

Top stories

How the national emblem appeared – including so far secret communism designs

Even Slovaks often do not know why the national emblem depicts a white double-cross, and not the Kriváň peak, or the design by artist Vincent Hložník. They also do not know why it makes a difference whether it is…

Offical Slovak national emblem and colours

Bratislava Zoo will have new wolf breeding station

One of most significant investments of the Bratislava Zoo in the year 2017 will be the building of a new wolf breeding station.

Foreigners: Events around Slovakia Photo

Tips for performances and other events in the Slovak regions between February 17 and February 26, including a race on old wooden sleighs, an operetta premiere, a lot of jazz, classical and rock music, and more.

Rce in krňačky sleighing, Turecká 2017

Some food really is better in Austria, study finds

EC says its role is to monitor safety, not quality – but Slovaks want the same as Austrians, says minister.

Illustrative stock photo