Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Government prepares first privatization

ALTHOUGH the new Robert Fico government has pledged not to privatize state property, it is already planning the sale of a 37 percent stake in Poštová Banka (PB) owned by the state debt consolidation agency Slovenská Konsolidačná (SKo).

ALTHOUGH the new Robert Fico government has pledged not to privatize state property, it is already planning the sale of a 37 percent stake in Poštová Banka (PB) owned by the state debt consolidation agency Slovenská Konsolidačná (SKo).

PB is one of Slovakia's smallest banks with total assets of only Sk26.4 billion. Its majority owner is the Istrokapitál financial group, which has a 55.5 percent stake.

However, representatives of the ruling Smer party's coalition partners, the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) and the Slovak National Party (SNS), say they were not informed of the planned sale of the PB stake.

"Nobody discussed this with us," HZDS deputy chairman Milan Urbáni told the Pravda daily.

Fico's spokeswoman, Silvia Glendová, said that the government's decision not to privatize state property had only covered assets owned directly by the state or by the National Property Fund.

"That means that while the state owns a 100 percent stake in SKo, it does not own its assets," Glendová said.

The state shares in PB will be bought by the bank itself, with Istrokapitál increasing the bank's share capital by the same sum.


- Martina Jurinová

Top stories

A Slovak prisoner tattooed in Auschwitz, remained silent until he grew very old

Lale Sokolov fell in love in the concentration camp; only those close to him knew his story.

A tattoo, illustrative stock photo

Kiska: Only president can bestow awards

President Andrej Kiska turned to Constitutional Court over the law on state awards recently passed by the government.

President Andrej Kiska granting awards, January 1, 2018

Global warming is a myth, claims a hoax

According to recent hoaxes published online, snow in the Sahara disproves global warming and milk can block airways.

The snowfall in Sahara can be seen in this satellite picture.

Blog: Are flying cars coming to the skies?

At least 19 companies, including a Slovak one, are currently developing flying car planes, but there are still many issues that must be worked out.

AeroMobil