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The Slovak Mardi Gras

FAŠIANGY, or Shrovetide, is the carnival period between the Epiphany (January 6) and Ash Wednesday (February 21 this year).

photo: SITA

Celebrations in the village of Krasňany in the Žilina Region included feasts, folk songs and dance, costumes, and the burial of a double bass, which was seen off with songs of farewell to the carnival period.

The western Slovak town of Nitra's celebrations made up with enthusiasm for what they lacked in urbanity. Their Fat Tuesday celebrations included concerts, a street market, and a carnival parade featuring 'the scariest puppets in Slovakia', courtesy of the Divadlo Maska theatre.

FAŠIANGY, or Shrovetide, is the carnival period between the Epiphany (January 6) and Ash Wednesday (February 21 this year). Fašiangy used to be the merriest part of the year, filled with lively dancing and rich feasting. Today this traditional period is celebrated with dances and balls and culminates before the beginning of lent with masked carnival processions and the funeral and burial of a double bass.

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